Tag Archives: Link Local Address

New Chapter: The come back!


new-chapter

Is it a month since you heard a my last blog post? Nope, maybe two. For my long day of silence, I am coming back for good to share again another chapter of my learning after the Ipv6 session.

Have you learnt something on my past posts? Let me give you a recap:

IPv6 for beginners – I gave highlights of IPV6 for those who are new in this term.

Introduction – I have stated all about me. Few are asking and telling me to make a post that only tackles who I am! So, I made a post for them.

Link Local Address – It defines what a Link Local Address is.

IPv6 Network AddressIPv6 Network Address corresponds to the first 64 bits of the 128 bits IPv6 address.

IPv6: No ARPWhat corresponds to ARP in IPv4 to IPv6.

Convert: IPv6 to IPv4 – Explains how to convert IPV6 to IPv4 and vice versa.

Aside from these stuffs, I have made a blog about those unrelated to IT as well:

Things Need to be Addressed! and Sorry: Easy to say, Hard To Mean.

You can go to my personal blog which has a tag of The best diary ever.

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IPv6 Network Address


ipv6-network-address

IPv6 Network Address corresponds to the first 64 bits of the 128 bits IPv6 address.Refer below:

0010000000000001.0000110110111000.0000100011110101. 0001000010100101.

0000000000000000.0000000000000000.0000000000000000.0000000000000000

The zeros in red are what the network address portion means… Let’s say:

0010  0000  0000  0001 : 0000  1101  1011  1000 : 0000  1000  1111  0101  :  0001  0000  1010  0101

These are those reds at the top that is grouped again into nibbles. I would take into consideration that you have a knowledge to conversion from binary to hexadecimal already! If not, refer to the tutorial. Let’s convert them by group:

0010  0000  0000  0001 : 0000  1101  1011  1000 : 0000  1000  1111  0101  :  0001  0000  1010  0101

2        0       0       1  :  0       13       11      8  :  0        8        15       5  :  1        0       10       5

We know that IPv6 is written in hex… And that it only covers a span from 0-9 and A-F :

0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  A  B  C  D  E  F

So, the above statement becomes:

2001  :  0DB8  :  08F5  :  10A5        or         2001  :  DB8  :  8F5  :  10A5

Meaning, you can omit unused zeros in the beginning of the statement.

I put into instance that you understood everything,… So, before you go, I would like to test you…

Putting into instance that you are given a bits of 0001  0010  0011  0010 : 0101  0110  0111  1000 : 1001  1010  1011  1100 : 1101  1110  1111  0001, now give me the Network Address of my P.C. in IPv6… leave your answer as a comment below. thanks.

Link Local Address


link-local-address

You can now manage on your IPv6 addresses. But, you will wonder, why is that their is more than one IP address found with just only one device? The answer is simple. It is put there for you to read this article.

Link Local Address always starts with FE80  :  :  … : …  .  :  ..  :  As you enable your router, this address is generated directly as one of your addresses. Now, how does the router know about your address? How was it generated?

Remember with your MAC Address? This is the one used to generate a Link Local Address. Check this:

Host A for example has a 0000.1111.1111 for its MAC Address.

First thing to do is cut that address in half. So, it becomes 0000.11 \ 11.1111..

Next, insert characters in the middle… Constantly, those characters are FFFE

The output would be: 0000.11FF.FE11.1111

then, if we are going to elaborate the binary equivalence for the above item is:

0000  0000  0000  0000  . 0001  0001  1111  1111  .  1111  1110  0001  0001. 0001  0001  0001  0001

you will count from the very left from 1 to 7… Then flip the seventh one.. example..:

0000  0010  0000  0000  . 0001  0001  1111  1111  .  1111  1110  0001  0001. 0001  0001  0001  0001

then,.. convert again back to hexadecimal like this:

0200.11FF.FE11.1111 . Omit unused zero. The output then become this with the correct separator for IPv6.

200:11FF:FE11:1111

The result is what we called Link Local Address.